Phycology

Year
1
Academic year
2019-2020
Code
02001850
Subject Area
Ecology
Language of Instruction
Portuguese
Mode of Delivery
Face-to-face
Duration
SEMESTRIAL
ECTS Credits
6.0
Type
Elective
Level
2nd Cycle Studies - Mestrado

Recommended Prerequisites

Previous studies on algal biology.

Teaching Methods

Theoretical, practical and laboratory, field and tutorial.

Learning Outcomes

To know, to understand and to be able to demonstrate knowledge on the main groups of algal groups, diversity and classification used, fundamental aspects of the biology of these organisms such as morphology, reproduction, habitat and their ecological and economic importance.

Work Placement(s)

No

Syllabus

The development and scope of Phycology. Evolution of phycological studies at Coimbra University.The Algoteca of Coimbra (ACOI) as a unique scientific resource. The importance of algal collections for conservation of biodiversity. Prokaryotic algae: origin of an atmosphere rich in oxygen.  Cell structure, classification, diversity and importance. Endosymbiosis and origin of the eukaryotic algae. Detailed comparative study of the cell structure in different groups: cell coverings and cel wall, chloroplasts and flagella, cell division. ; cloroplastos e flagelos, divisão celular Ecology of marine and freshwater algae. Phytoplankton, periphyton, seaweeds - major groups and organisms, physical and chemical parameters that affect growth, methodologies of study, adaptations. Pollution and its effects on algal communities, with a phocus on the development of blooms, toxins of cyanobacteria, dinoflagellates, diatoms and other algae.

Head Lecturer(s)

Lília Maria Antunes dos Santos

Assessment Methods

Assessment
Project: 50.0%
Exam: 50.0%

Bibliography

Bellinger, E.G. & Sigee, D.C. 2010. Freshwater Algae. Wiley- Blackwell.

Lee, R.E. 2008. Phycology. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

Graham, L. E., & Wilcox, L. W. 2000. Algae. Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ.

Van den Hoek C., D. Mann & H.M. Jhams. 1995. Algae: An introduction to phycology. University of Cambridge.